Healthy Communities- October 4th, 2013

Healthy Communities

Videos: Your Unhealthy Love For Public Health In 14 Images
Do you feel like you’re not quite on the same page as friends and family when it comes to following the latest epidemiological studies, health promotion best practices, and advocacy campaigns? Me too. So I won’t judge you if you don’t judge me.

Resources

health policy guideHealth in All Policies Guide Launches Today
What does urban planning have to do with asthma? How can mobile phone access promote health in rural communities? Every decision we make can have an impact on health: some make us healthier, others create barriers. Health in All Policies is a collaborative approach to improving the health of all people by incorporating health considerations into decision-making across sectors and policy areas.

Today, the Public Health Institute announces a comprehensive new tool to help all sectors strengthen their capacity to address health and equity: Health in All Policies: A Guide for State and Local Governments. The Guide was created by the Public Health Institute, the California Department of Public Health and the American Public Health Association in response to growing interest in using collaborative approaches to improve population health by embedding health considerations into decision-making processes across a broad array of sectors. The Guide draws heavily on the experiences of the California Health in All Policies Task Force and incorporates information from published and gray literature and interviews with people across the country. You’ll Find:

  • A discussion of why Health in All Policies approaches are necessary to meet today’s health and equity challenges
  • Five key elements of Health in All Policies, and how to apply them to your work
  • Stories of cities, counties, and states that are implementing Health in All Policies
  • “Food for Thought”—Lists of questions that leaders of a Health in All Policies initiative might want to consider
  • Tips for identifying new partners, building meaningful collaborative relationships across sectors, and maintaining those partnerships over time
  • A discussion of different approaches to healthy public policy, including applying a health lens to “non-health” policies
  • Reflections on funding, evaluation and the use of data to support Health in All Policies
  • Information about messaging and tips on how to talk about Health in All Policies
  • Over 50 annotated resources for additional information

Team Up to Improve Physical Activity in Schools
With the passage of legislation (see ORS 329.496) in the 2011 session that requires Oregon schools to implement PE in grades K-8 by the start of the 2017-2018 school year, public health professionals have an opportunity to support quality PE instruction and activities toward meeting the CDC Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. We know that getting children to be active at least 60 minutes a day is one step toward combating the obesity epidemic. It is not too early to be a resource to school partners, since many have not yet begun planning for full implementation of this statute.
Many tools and resources exist to help improve physical activity in schools:

Reports and Articlesworksitehealthyfoods Workplace wellness programs a growing trend for employers: Affordable Care Act to play a role
The Nation’s Health
About half of U.S. employers offer some type of wellness promotion initiative. And that number could increase even further when new Affordable Care Act rules go into effect in January 2014.

With Tastes Growing Healthier, McDonald’s Aims to Adapt Its Menu
NYTimes: 9.26.13
Under pressure to provide healthier meals, McDonald’s announced on Thursday that it would no longer market some of its less nutritional options to children and said it also planned to include offerings of fruits and vegetables in many of its adult menu combinations.

Diabetes tied to higher risk of breast, colon cancer
An analysis of data from 20 studies showed that patients with type 2 diabetes were 23% more likely to develop breast cancer and 26% more likely to develop colon cancer. Diabetes patients also had a higher risk of death from these diseases compared with people without diabetes, researchers reported at the European Cancer Congress.

Assessing US Sodium Intake through Dietary Data and Urine Biomarkers
Advances in Nutrition
New findings on the accuracy of estimating population 24-h urinary sodium excretion from spot urine specimens or sodium intake from 24-h dietary recalls were recently presented during an American Society for Nutrition symposium at the Experimental Biology meeting. Differences in accuracy by gender, body mass index, and race were evident as well as by timing of spot urine collections. Findings from the symposium include –

  • Although some published equations appear promising for estimating average population sodium intake, others are biased.
  • Estimated individual sodium intake is highly variable and adjustment for within-individual variation in intake is required for estimating population prevalence or percentiles.
  • Estimates indicate US sodium intake remains high.

Study Findings May Explain Delayed Onset of Heart Disease in Women
Sep. 24, 2013
A biological ability to compensate for the body’s reduced response to insulin may explain why women typically develop heart disease 10 years later than men, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Majority of Patients Who Qualify for Lifesaving Heart Treatment Do Not Receive It
Sep. 24, 2013
A new study of patients who died of sudden cardiac arrest, a usually fatal condition that causes the heart to stop beating, shows the majority who qualified to receive potentially lifesaving treatment did not receive it.

How ‘Bad’ Cholesterol Causes Atherosclerosis in Humans: Stem Cells Play a Key Role
Sep. 23, 2013
University at Buffalo translational researchers are developing a richer understanding of atherosclerosis in humans, revealing a key role for stem cells that promote inflammation.

Risk of heart attack and stroke doubles for patients with gout
Medical News Today:
3rd, 2013
New research published in Rheumatologyjournal has found that having gout doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke. The research tracked the health of more than 205,000 gout patients using data spanning five decades to determine links between gout and heart attack and stroke.

The findings showed that gout patients are twice as likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke as those without gout. It is thought that the higher levels of uric acid which cause gout are also a strong risk factor for heart attack and stroke.
Medical News Today: October 3, 2013
Researchers from the UC Davis Health System have discovered a biological link between diabetes and heart disease, which may explain why diabetes sufferers have an increased risk for heart disease. This is according to a study published in the journalNature.
The researchers found that when blood sugars are abnormally high (hyperglycemia), this activates a biological pathway that causes irregular heartbeats – a condition called cardiac arrhythmia – that is linked to heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

Biological link between diabetes and heart disease found
Medical News Today: October 3, 2013
Researchers from the UC Davis Health System have discovered a biological link between diabetes and heart disease, which may explain why diabetes sufferers have an increased risk for heart disease. This is according to a study published in the journalNature.
The researchers found that when blood sugars are abnormally high (hyperglycemia), this activates a biological pathway that causes irregular heartbeats – a condition called cardiac arrhythmia – that is linked to heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

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