Healthy Communities- June 27, 2014

Resources
childhoodrurall Childhood Obesity Prevention Toolkit for Rural Communities
Nemours prepared a Childhood Obesity Prevention Toolkit for Rural Communities. The toolkit provides a range of strategies and success stories to assist practitioners in child-serving sectors, including: early care and education, schools, out-of-school time, community initiatives and healthcare. The profiled communities were able to leverage their unique rural resources and benefited from close community bonds to improve children’s health. The toolkit also includes policy recommendations and an overview of the evaluation process. Please feel free to share the link with interested colleagues, networks, stakeholders and constituencies.  If you have questions, please feel free to contact Daniella Gratale, Senior Manager of Advocacy at Nemours, at daniella.gratale@nemours.org.

Fresh off the press: Oregon Quality Connection
Highlighting the latest accreditation and quality news for the Oregon public health system. Read success stories and best practices in quality improvement, performance management, and accreditation initiatives.
Previous issues of theOregon Quality Connection newsletter are available to download at the Oregon Public Health Division’s Public Health Accreditation and Quality Improvement webpage:  http://www.healthoregon.org/accreditation. We welcome your feedback and submissions for future issues!

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity and the Affordable Care Act
By focusing on prevention, the Affordable Care Act promotes better health for adults and children. Two of the recommended preventive services covered at no cost sharing because of the Affordable Care Act are directly related to nutrition and physical activity: dietary counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease, and obesity screening and counseling for all adults and for children aged 6 and over. To learn more about how the Affordable Care Act supports healthy eating and physical activity, please visit healthcare.gov.

The Division of Community Health (DCH) formally announces the launch of Community Health Online Resource Center (CHORC)!
The CHORC is a searchable database that houses over 400 resources to help communities implement changes to prevent chronic disease and promote healthy living.  The available resources include webinars, policy briefs, guides, toolkits, and other practical materials which are organized by content areas.  The CHORC is updated on a quarterly basis, to ensure that the resources are relevant and current.  You can access the CHORC by clicking the following link: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dch/online-resource/index.htm.

HHS’ Million Hearts Initiative Launches Health Eating Resource Center
RWJF, 2014
The Million Hearts initiative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has launched a new online resource center to promote healthier eating by individuals and families. The Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Resource Center features lower-sodium, heart-healthy recipes and family-friendly meal plans, and emphasizes managing sodium intake. The searchable recipes include nutritional facts and use everyday ingredients. “This resource helps people see that it’s not about giving up the food you love, but choosing lower sodium options that taste great,” said Tom Frieden, MD, Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Small changes can make a big difference.  We can prevent 11 million cases of high blood pressure each year if everyone reduced their daily sodium intake to 2,300 mg.” The Million Hearts initiative was launched with the goal of preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. Read more on nutrition.

Reports and Articles
oranges3-D Mammograms Improve Breast Cancer Detection Rate, Reduce Recall Rate
RWJF, 2014
Tomosynthesis—also known as 3-D mammography—can increase the detection rate of breast cancer while also decreasing false positives that can lead to multiple and unnecessary re-tests, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers analyzed the results of 454,850 examinations, finding that when 3-D mammography was combined with traditional digital mammograms the detection rate for breast cancer climbed 40 percent while there was a 15 percent decrease in the recall rate, or the percentage of women who needed additional screening due to inconclusive results. The findings come as more and more hospitals and physicians are turning to 3-D mammography. The researchers cautioned that more study was needed into the relatively new technology. Read more on cancer.

Study:  Public Transportation Policy Often Doesn’t Take Public Health into Account
Many officials and planners continue to ignore public health issues such as air pollution, crime and numerous traffic hazards when designing transportation projects, according to a new study in the Journal of Planning Education and Research. This is especially true for non-white and poor neighborhoods, which often find themselves along major roads, making this a social justice issue, as well. “The public health effects of heavy traffic are broad,” said study author Carolyn McAndrews, PhD, assistant professor at the University of Colorado Denver’s College of Architecture and Planning. “Studies have found associations between high-traffic roads and high mortality rates, lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, poor birth outcomes and traffic-related injuries.” The study was based on an analysis of Verona Road near Madison, Wisconsin, which can see nearly 60,000 vehicles per day and is in a neighborhood that is home to approximately 2,500 people.Read more on transportation.

Many U.S. Cancer Survivors Face Serious Financial Burdens
Many U.S. cancer survivors face significant economic burdens due to growing medical costs, missed work and reduced productivity, according to a study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “Cancer survivors face physical, emotional, psychosocial, employment and financial challenges as a result of their cancer diagnosis and treatment,” said Donatus U. Ekwueme, PhD, a senior health economist at CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. The number of cancer survivors is expected to increase by more than 30 percent in the next decade—to 18 million Americans. Researchers analyzed data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s 2008-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to estimate annual medical costs and productivity losses among cancer survivors  aged 18 years and older, and among persons without a cancer diagnosis. Among those employed, more than 42 percent had to make changes to their work hours and duties. The report also found that about 10 percent of survivors aged 65 years and younger were uninsured and likely to have a larger financial burden compared to survivors with some source of payment for medical services. Read more on cancer

Childhood obesity linked to excess weight, smoking during pregnancy
Children were more likely to be obese through their teen years if their mothers smoked while pregnant or were overweight early in pregnancy, according to a study in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Children who fell into the early persistent obesity trajectory had a twofold greater odds of asthma and high blood pressure compared with the normal weight trajectory group. Reuters

AHA: Only One-third of Cancer Patients with Heart Problems Seek Proper Treatment
Approximately 12 percent of older breast cancer patients go on to develop heart failure within three years—often as a result of their cancer treatment—but only one-third of those patients sought the help of a cardiologist within 90 days of experiencing heart problems, according to the American Heart Association. Patients who do not see a cardiologist are less likely to receive the standard therapy for heart failure, putting them at risk of lower quality of care and demonstrating an important area where oncologists and cardiologists can collaborate, according to Jersey Chen, MD, MPH, lead author of the study and a research scientist and cardiologist at Kaiser Permanente. “The bottom line is, if you have breast cancer and you’re treated with anthracyclines or trastuzumab, you should know they have side effects,” said Chen in a release. “And if you have symptoms of heart problems like shortness of breath or swelling in the feet or legs, seek attention quickly, preferably with doctors familiar and comfortable with treating heart failure after cancer therapy.” Read more on heart health.

Long Hours Spent Sitting Linked to Higher Risk for Colon, Endometrial Cancers
Previous studies have linked extended time spent sitting to health problems such as heart disease, blood clots, higher blood sugar and even early death. According to a new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, you can now add increased risk for colon and endometrial cancers to the list. Researchers analyzed the findings of 43 studies covering 70,000 cases of cancer, determining that:

  • People who spent the most time sitting during the day had a 24 percent increased risk of getting colon cancer
  • People who spent the most time sitting in front of a television has a 54 percent increased risk for colon cancer
  • There was a 32 percent increased risk for endometrial—or uterine—cancer for women who spent the most time seated and a 66 percent increased risk for those who watched the most television
  • Every two-hour increase in sitting time was linked to an 8 percent increased risk of colon cancer and a 10 percent increased risk of endometrial cancer
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