Healthy Communities- May 8th, 2015

Resources
heart
May is American Stroke Month and High Blood Pressure Education Month
In observance of American Stroke Month and High Blood Pressure Education Month, Million Hearts® will focus on increasing public awareness of stroke risk and warning signs and educating Americans about blood pressure control. To get more people to join the effort, the Million Hearts® initiative is hosting a number of activities throughout the month of May to raise awareness.

Business Pulse: Heart Health
Business Pulse is a series of quarterly business features created by the CDC Foundation, an independent nonprofit organization. This Heart Health issue of Business Pulse highlights specific heart health challenges faced by businesses. Business Pulse: Heart Health also features an interactive infographic that provides useful facts and links, along with a question and answer feature and online CDC tools, guidelines and resources.

CDC Healthy Schools: New Toolkit!
The Tool Kit for Managing Food Allergies in Schools was developed by CDC to help schools in implementing the Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies in School and Early Care and Education Programs.

RWJF Resource for Healthy Schools
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has launched a new ‘Healthy Schools Environments’ feature highlighting RWJF-funded research showing that healthier school meals and snacks can help improve kids’ diets and may help reduce obesity, as well as that increased physical activity for students improves health and academic achievement.

Safe Routes to School Factsheets
The Safe Routes to School National Partnership recently released three new factsheets to help overcome obstacles and get rural dwellers the health benefits of walking and bicycling. http://saferoutespartnership.org/resourcecenter/publications

Reports and Articles

arthritisahead
Keep Moving to Stay a Step Ahead of Arthritis

New York Times
I was a fanatical tennis player for decades until my increasingly painful arthritic knees forced me to stop playing. The knees were replaced two years later, but by then, I had filled in my life with other activities, including a daily three-mile walk and aerobic swim, and cycling for exercise and errands.
Now I also walk a puppy four times a day. I’ve made many new friends and, much to my surprise, I don’t miss tennis at all.
Osteoarthritis is something nearly all of us can expect to face if we live long enough. A quarter of the population has it, and the percentage is expected to rise significantly in the years ahead. Two-thirds of people with arthritis are younger than 65, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

Harvard’s Healthy Eating Plate now available in 15 languages
Boston, MA ─ The Healthy Eating Plate—a simple, visual meal-planning guide that addresses important deficiencies in the U.S. government’s MyPlate icon—has now been translated into 14 new languages by its developers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, giving it the potential to reach over half the world’s population.
Like the U.S. government’s MyPlate, the Healthy Eating Plate is easy to understand—but unlike the government’s icon, it provides clear guidance on such topics as the importance of eating more whole grains and avoiding refined grains, and distinguishing between healthy proteins and those that should be limited or avoided.

Bike-powered grocery delivery service aims for major expansion
Woodburn Independent
Rolling Oasis, a Lents-based nonprofit that home-delivers $20 worth of organic produce to its customers each week, is angling to leap from Southeast into Northeast, too.
Proprietor Brandon Rhodes launched the service a year ago and has been delivering since then in his own Lents neighborhood ever since, adding extras like coffee and jam for additional fees.
“We want post-retail grocery innovations to be accessible for all of our neighbors, not just those who can afford it,” Rhodes writes in the description of the new Indiegogo campaignRolling Oasis has launched to complete the expansion. “Alternative delivery services inflate their prices beyond what you’d find at Fred Meyer — leaving tighter-budget households behind.”(more…)

Community Health Needs Assessments— Aligning the Interests of Public Health and the Health Care Delivery System to Improve Population Health
Institute of Medicine
Recognizing the challenges of improving health outcomes depends on a complex set of factors, many beyond the control of the health care system, a recent report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) stresses the importance of population health measurement to ensure accountability to improve the quality of health care as well as population health outcomes (IOM, 2013). Noting that an unprecedented wealth of health data is providing new opportunities to understand and address community level concerns, the IOM argues that the sharing and collaborative use of data and analysis is essential for the integration of primary care and public health in the interest of population health (IOM, 2012). Several discussion papers call for new approaches to population health measurement (Auerbach et al., 2013; Hester, 2013; Shortell, 2013). Stoto (2014) addresses these measurement issues more completely, applying performance measurement concepts in a variety of population health settings.
Read the full discussion paper>>

May 2015 Vital Signs: Hispanic Health
Hispanics or Latinos are the largest racial/ethnic minority population in the US. Heart disease and cancer in Hispanics are the two leading causes of death, accounting for about 2 of 5 deaths, which is about the same for whites.

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy wants to move U.S. health care toward a ‘prevention-based society’
Apr. 23, 2015 (The Washington Post) — My overarching goal is to get every individual, every institution and every sector in America…to ask themselves the question [of] what they can do to improve the health and the strength of our nation.

Children Watching Television

Children Watching Television

Childhood Obesity Is Associated With Just A Single Hour Of TV A Day
Huffpost Healthy Living
A new study has found that children in kindergarten and first grade who watch at least 60 minutes of television a day aremore likely to be overweight or obese than those less exposed to the tube.
Currently, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a two hour cap on daily TV consumption in childhood, but this study suggests that most kids should watch a maximum of half of that.
“Children watching one to two hours were heavier than those watching less than one hour, and were almost as heavy as those watching greater than two hours daily,” the study’s author, Dr. Mark DeBoer of the University of Virginia, told Newsweek.

Breastfeeding may change women’s breast cancer risk
CBSNews
Women who breast-feed their babies and later develop breast cancer are less likely to have the cancer return or to die from it than women who do not breast-feed, new research shows.
“We found in this study of over 1,600 women with breast cancer that those who previously breast-fed had a 30 percent overall decreased risk of their breast cancer recurring,” said study leader Marilyn Kwan, a research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente division of research in Oakland, Calif. “We also found those who previously breast-fed had a 28 percent reduced risk of dying from their breast cancer.”
The study was published online April 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Study: Diet plus exercise may be best for diabetes prevention
Diet and exercise together improved insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients better than either approach alone, St. Louis University researchers reported in Diabetes Care. Researchers said exercise-related weight loss didn’t improve glucoregulation more than weight loss from calorie restriction. Science World Report (5/6)

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